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The spotted hyena’s famous “laugh” is actually a sound made to alert other group members to a source of food. This noise can be heard up to three miles away, and is one of many sounds made by this sociable species to communicate with each other.

Hyenas are skilled hunters as well as scavengers, and their large, powerful jaws allow them to chomp through every part of their prey, including the skin and bones. The only parts which cannot be digested are hair, horns and hooves - the hyena will regurgitate these in pellets.

Hyenas are found in many habitats, including woodland, savannah and desert, though being nocturnal, they are rarely observed. Human-wildlife conflict has long been a problem. Hyenas are known to have eaten people, though it is more likely that they will kill livestock, which results in them being targeted by hunters.

Information sourced from African Wildlife Foundation http://www.awf.org/

The lion is one of the most sought-after safari species, and one of the most impressive to observe. Living in prides of around 15 individuals, lions adhere to strict social structures. Groups consist of related females and their cubs, who are often born around the same time and raised communally. New mothers, however, will live in dens with their cubs for the first few weeks, moving them one by one to a new den every few days to avoid building up a scent which would attract predators. A new male taking over a pride will often kill all cubs, and mate with each of the females.

The male’s distinctive mane plays a role in making it look much larger and more intimidating to other lions and spotted hyenas - the lion’s main rivals. It is the lionesses, however, who are responsible for around 90% of the hunting, doing so in coordinated groups which can allow them to pursue larger species such as buffalo and giraffes as well as smaller antelope. The kill is not shared evenly, however, and only the larger prey is brought back to the pride, making survival difficult for cubs during times of hardship.

Information sourced from African Wildlife Foundation http://www.awf.org/

The striking leopard is one of the hardest large species to observe in Uganda, thanks to its nocturnal, solitary behavior and well-camouflaged coat.

Their survival is partly due to their adaptability to warm and cold climates and ability to climb trees while carrying heavy prey - keeping it safe from other predators such as lions and hyenas. They can run at incredible speeds of up to 58 km (36 miles) per hour, and hunt antelopes and monkeys as well as fish, birds, insects and reptiles.

Historically, leopards were hunted for their beautiful fur; loss of habitat is now their greatest threat.

Information sourced from African Wildlife Foundation (Link to http://www.awf.org/

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